Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

A Guanaco's Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  1. lalobalocaart:

    FIRST EVER Q/T*POC BIRTHWORK PROJECT TRAINING: DEBRIEF AND A SPECIAL INTERVIEW WITH RAFAEL/A LUNA PIZANO
    Oooof, que fuerte! It has taken me literally three weeks to be able to sit down and write about this experience. The first ever QTPOC Birthwork Training was in Seattle this past July, it was a beautiful gathering of souls, it was life affirming, it was fun, it was like being 18-years old again! Lately I have been dealing with the fact that I am growing up, that I am pretty much in my mid-twenties and that it is kind of depressing to ‘grow up’- this gathering was a lot of things but sobre todo refreshing. It made me feel exited once again. I am still trying to figure out teleporting so i can keep building with the people I met in the training.
    We had an amazing array of presenters; mothers, students midwife, post-partum companion/doulas, midwives, body workers and straight up bad asses. The folx that got together came from all over the US, from different cultures and backgrounds- knowledge in the room was so RICH. I even got to taste a little bit of a dried placenta and meet two little people being brought up in Queer families! The only way I could describe the whole experience, besides saying that I felt 18-years old again, would be to compare it to the first time I touched a placenta- it was warm and rich with life. 
    Here is a sneak peak on what the training covered: language check, de-medicalizing body parts, hirstory of midwives of color, navigating ‘doula’ or companion work as QTPOCs, rebozo skill-share, unexpected birth outcomes, belly binding, post-partum support and healing, chest/breast feeding, break-out sessions on adoption, queer family making, insemination, abortion, Trans* birthwork and much much more!
    I am beyond exited to see what comes out of this training, some of us talked about future gatherings in the South next to rivers while skinny dipping and eating fried food. Some of us are dreaming to see this happen in other places and to get more QT*POC folx involved in Full-Spectrum Birthwork. This post es un granito de arena, hoping to inspires more folx to get involve in this work and also to start believing that we can have families too and that we DESERVE to make and create families too. I cannot wait to bring a little baby into this world in a room full of bad ass colorful sea horse and fairy birthworkers throwing glitter around! This training has definitely given me the necessary push to start diving more into birthwork, so if you are in central LA area and looking for a birthworker feel free to contact me through my page! 
    Here is an interview with Rafael/a Luna Pizano, one of the brains behind the QTPOC Birthwork Project and also one of the many facilitators of this beautiful soul gathering.
    Who is Rafael/a Luna Pizano?
    I’m a descendant of Pilipin@, Mexica and mestiz@ blood, walking the red road as a two-spirit/ed child.  I am a bodyworker by trade, artist by night, and dreamer by day. I am passionate about reproductive justice for all genders and bodies, especially for transpeople (i.e. transwomxn, transmxn and gender-fluid folks) and people of color. I really love food, playing capoeira, finding unnatural lipstick colors, dipping my head in the ocean and complaining about how much my cat likes to cuddle.
    What does Trans* and Queer BIrthwork mean to you and why do you think it is important to train QTPOC folx as birthworkers?
    Trans and Queer birthwork…means that ALL kinds of bodies and genders have great access to reproductive support including full-spectrum pregnancy care. This also means that the folks offering this support to trans and queer folks are of trans and queer communities or have been asked by people from these communities to support them in solidarity.  I feel it’s important to train q/tpoc to become birthworkers because we (q/tpoc) also need reproductive care that’s respectful, culturally-competent and appropriate to our needs.  Who better to support us than folks from our own community?  We need the necessary skills and knowledge to be able to at least provide basic support for each other through all aspects of reproductive health, pregnancy and fertility practices.  I want us to know how to engage with our medical providers (esp if they aren’t q/tpoc) about our reproductive health, armed with more education about our bodies and cycles.  This knowledge of our bodies’ reproductive needs and health is imperative to our survival especially as transpeople because so many medical providers are still ignorant to our existence, let alone our specific healthcare needs.  There is still very little research or data gathering on what is ‘normal’ for transbodies regarding our reproductive cycles and how gender-affirming hormones or surgeries impact this aspect of our lives for the long-term.  By creating more access to reproductive education, I hope that more q/tpoc will not only be able to provide reproductive care for each other, but also begin recording our stories and experiences as part of a collective memory that can teach us about what is common to our experiences as transpeople navigating pregnancy or reproductive shifts.  
       
    How can other QTPOC folx get involved in birthwork? How do they get started?
    More q/tpoc can get involved with birthwork by self-educating and reading, connecting with others online (including us at the QTPOC Birthwork Project), listening to their elders and asking questions more specifically related to pregnancy/childbirth (folks might have to ask the questions several times before anyone feels like answering lol), and definitely doing the self-healing work that often comes up when we enter the realm of birthwork on any level.  Taking trainings for doulas/labor companions, connecting with local doula groups or asking birthworkers in the field about entry points to birthwork are a few ways to get started. Unfortunately, most trainings, birthwork networks and providers are of white/cis/hetero/upper-class communities and often do not have the resources or foundations to even begin understanding what an aspiring q/tpoc birthworker may bring into a space.  Q/tpocs will probably wage through the usual mix of righteous rage, trauma, sadness and lack of motivation that occurs when met with the well-intentioned white ladies that often run birth practices in the U.S. (especially up here in the NW).  I suggest that q/tpocs try their best to find poc birthworkers to start and interview them, talk story, get book recommendations, etc. as they begin to travel along a path that has been lonely for q/tpoc and two-spirit/ed folks since ‘colonization.’
        
    What do you envision for QTPOC Birthwork Project? Are there plans of future trainings?
    I envision that the Q/TPOC Birthwerq Project will continue to create other workshops, probably smaller in size/duration and topics covered, to focus more on specific aspects of pregnancy, fertility and sexual health as it relates to transpeople and queer folks of color.  I also see gatherings that are more for trans and queer community-members interested in healing around reproductive health, where people can come together and share their fertility and pregnancy experiences/questions/dreams in a safer space and with people that can answer questions or offer resources.  I see these kinds of gatherings especially for transpeople, because I feel that trans folks need some other steps around self-healing before we think about supporting cis-people during pregnancy (i.e. labor companion work) because that is still the majority of who is pregnant.  I hope that we can continue to connect with trans community and meet transwomxn that are interested in birthwork. Because transwomxn are womxn, I want to see my sisters taking up their right to womxn’s legacies of traditional birth practices and support a gathering where other womxn (trans, cis, etc) of color can share basic fertility and pregnancy practices with each other.  I also see a gathering for existing q/tpoc birthworkers to come together and share healing time, feed each other, and nourish our drive for this work because it’s fuckin’ exhausting to be us and struggling for equal reproductive access.  I dream of a men’s pregnancy gathering where all kinds (trans, cis, etc.) of men of color can come together and learn more about the basics of pregnancy, reproductive resources and get comfortable talking about it because men are often part of the birthing equation, but don’t often know how to show up in a helpful way.  I have many more dreams, but I’m more interested in hearing what people from our first workshop are dreaming of now that they’ve had a taste of what birthwork can offer.  I hope that participants from our first workshop will want to create gatherings in their local communities that encourage conversation, skill-sharing and connection necessary to continue the reproductive justice work of our elders in a new way.
    Q/TPOC Birthwerq Project email: qtpoc.birth.work@gmail.com
    -by La Loba Loca. Gay.Queer Peruvian Muxer, Coxinera, tumblerista, body-powered tattooist, D.I.Y. fine artist, documentarista, Justicia Reproductiva advocate, Full Spectrum Birthworker and over all interested on autonomous health. If you are looking for birth and full spectrum companionship/doula in central Los Angeles, CA contact me and also check out my earth-loving goodies, reusable pads and chest/breast pads, atlalobaloca.bigcartel.com!
     
     
  2. theroguefeminist:

    nosoytuchiste:

    I’m Not a Joke (No Soy Tu Chiste) is a campaign spreading awareness for the LGBTI community through art and design, created by Daniel Arzola (@Arzola_d) in light of the recent violent acts against the sexually diverse community in Venezuela and the World. It initially seeks to expand in the online community. If you’d like to share your opinion please do so via twitter using the hashtag #ImNotaJoke. Like my page on Facebook and share the posters to support the cause! 

    For every T-Shirt you buy, one dollar will be donated to the campaign

    Shop: http://society6.com/Arzolad/tshirts

    trigger warning for the link - a few of the shirts in the shop depict a bruised and bloodied man with the implication he was a victim of a hate crime

     
     
  3. exgynocraticgrrl:

    Breaking The Male Code: After Steubenville, A Call To Action

     (Left to Right): Peter Buffett, Jimmie Briggs, Joe Ehrmann, Tony Porter,
     Dave Zirin and Moderator Eve Ensler.

     
     
  4. I can’t help but notice that this generation, selfie generation, is more concerned with online debates, passive activism, reblogging, intellectualizing gender to academic proportions, a little self absorbed and constantly posts the #selfie, fixates on micro aggressions, feels satisfied in calling online petitions and funding organizations activism.

    Isn’t this supported to be the “get their asses into the streets, fuck shit up and make their presence known” generation? The largest movement this generation has seen is Ferguson, and Occupy Wall Street, two very extremes in the political orientation spectrum.

    I want to see and be a part of something big but now that I’m an adult I want to see the youth make it happen. I’m taking a back seat. Or at least I’m doing that for now. Id like to see something poppa off. I want to be surprised.

     
     
  5. radicalheart82:

did-you-kno:

Researchers have achieved long distance brain-to-brain communication in humans. Patterned signals of phosphenes (the colors you see when your eyes close) were sent over the Internet to EEGs worn by users, who were able to exchange messages like “ciao” and “hola” with a 90% success rate. Source

Whaaaa?!?

    radicalheart82:

    did-you-kno:

    Researchers have achieved long distance brain-to-brain communication in humans. Patterned signals of phosphenes (the colors you see when your eyes close) were sent over the Internet to EEGs worn by users, who were able to exchange messages like “ciao” and “hola” with a 90% success rate. Source

    Whaaaa?!?

     
     
  6. olisaurusrex:

"Alternative R&B must die" FKA Twigs speaks out on racism in the music industry through genre-specifying:

"When I first released music and no one knew what I looked like, I would read comments like: ‘I’ve never heard anything like this before, it’s not in a genre,’” she continued. “And then my picture came out six months later, now she’s an R&B singer. I share certain sonic threads with classical music; my song “Preface” is like a hymn. So let’s talk about that. If I was white and blonde and said I went to church all the time, you’d be talking about the ‘choral aspect’. But you’re not talking about that because I’m a mixed-race girl from south London."

    olisaurusrex:

    "Alternative R&B must die" FKA Twigs speaks out on racism in the music industry through genre-specifying:

    "When I first released music and no one knew what I looked like, I would read comments like: ‘I’ve never heard anything like this before, it’s not in a genre,’” she continued. “And then my picture came out six months later, now she’s an R&B singer. I share certain sonic threads with classical music; my song “Preface” is like a hymn. So let’s talk about that. If I was white and blonde and said I went to church all the time, you’d be talking about the ‘choral aspect’. But you’re not talking about that because I’m a mixed-race girl from south London."

     
     
  7. micdotcom:

    1,200 aboriginal Canadian women have gone missing over the past 30 years. Hashtag asks #AmINext?

    On Aug. 17, Winnipeg police pulled the body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine out of the Red River near Alexander Docks.

    The scope of the tragedy prompted Holly Jarret of Hamilton, Ont. — cousin to Loretta Saunders, an indigenous woman who was murdered in February at age 26 — to launch the #AmINext hashtag earlier this month.

    So, what’s being done about it? | Follow micdotcom

     
     
  8. mehhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:

    Female BAMFs Throughout History

     
     
  9. (Source: sarahwalker)

     
     
  10. Selena - No Quiero Saber

    If you were born after the cold war, you probably don’t remember this.

     
     
  11.  
     
  12. caseybruce:

    Black and unarmed.

    Remember the names of unarmed Black men who were killed by police or vigilantes. This is only a short list, please reply with other names so we may remember these men.

    Trayvon Martin.

    The fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman took place on the night of February 26, 2012, in Sanford, Florida.  Martin was a 17-year-old African American high school student. He was unarmed and headed home after buying skittles and sweet tea from a gas station close to his home. George Zimmerman, a 28-year-old multi-racial Hispanic American was the neighborhood watch coordinator for the gated community where Martin was temporarily staying and where the shooting took place. Zimmerman, against the instructions of the Emergency dispatcher pursued Martin on foot calling him “the suspect.” When the case garnered international attention sparking protests all over the world, the state of Florida filled charges against him 46 days after Martin’s death. Zimmerman was tried for second-degree murder and manslaughterand found not guilty on Saturday, July 13, 2013.

    Ervin Jefferson

    The 18-year-old was shot and killed by two security guards — also African American — outside his Atlanta home on Saturday, March 24, 2012. His mother says that he was unarmed and trying to protect his sister from a crowd that was threatening her.

    Amadou Diallo

    22-year-old Amadou Ahmed Diallo, a Guinnea-Bissau immigrant, was killed when four white New York police officers in plain clothes fired 41 shots at him, 19 of which hit his body. The officers said they thought Diallo was reaching for a gun when they shot him in the doorway of his apartment. Turns out it was his wallet. During the trial, the officers admitted that they never considered the situation (four strangers in an unmarked car with guns approaching a guy on his stoop at night) from Diallo’s point of view. They were acquitted of all charges

     Patrick Dorismond

    The 26-year-old father of two young girls was shot to death in 2000 during a confrontation with undercover police officers who asked him where they could purchase drugs. An officer claimed thatDorismond — who was unarmed — grabbed his gun and caused his own death. But the incident made many wonder whether the recent acquittal of the officers in the Amadou Diallo case sent a signal that the police had a license to kill without consequence

    Ousmane Zongo

    In 2003 Officer Bryan A. Conroy confronted and killed Zongo in New York City during a raid on a counterfeit-CD ring with which Zongo had no involvement. Relatives of the 43-year-old man from Burkina Faso settled a lawsuit against the city for $3 million. The judge in the trial of the officer who shot him (and was convicted of criminally negligent homicide but did not serve jail time) said he was “insufficiently trained, insufficiently supervised and insufficiently led.”

    Timothy Stansbury

    Unarmed and with no criminal record, 19-year-old Stansbury was killed in 2004 in a Brooklyn, N.Y., stairwell. The officer who shot him said he was startled and fired by mistake. Police Commissioner Ray Kelly called his death “a tragic incident that compels us to take an in-depth look at our tactics and training, both for new and veteran officers.” A grand jury deemed it an accident.

    Sean Bell

    Hours before his wedding, 23-year-oldSean Bell left the strip that hosted his bachelor party, jumped into a car with two friends, and was killed when police fire 50 shots into his vehicle. Police say they opened fire after Bell rammed his car into an unmarked police van filled with plainclothes officers. They say they followed Bell and his friends outside the club suspecting that one person in their group had a gun. Referring to Bell and his friends, Mayor Bloomberg told the Associated Press "there is no evidence that they did anything wrong." A judge acquitted the officers of all charges in 2008. 

    Orlando Barlow

    While surrendering on his knees in front of four Las Vegas police officers, Orlando Barlow was shot with an assault rifle by officer Brian Hartman 50 feet away. Hartman argued that he feared Barlow was feigning surrender and about to grab a gun. Barlow was unarmed. A jury ruled the shooting “excusable.” Hartman later resigned from the force a month before a federal probe uncovered that he and other officers printed T-Shirts labeled ”BDRT” which stood for “Baby’s Daddy Removal Team” and “Big Dogs Run Together.” 

    Aaron Campbell

     Portland police officers got a call to check on a suicidal and armed man at an apartment complex. Aaron Campbell,25, came of the apartment walking backward toward police with his hands over his head. The Oregonian reported that police say Campbell ignored their orders to put his hands up. At which point one officer fired six bean bag shots at his back. Witnesses say they saw Campbell reach his arm around his back, where the beanbag struck him. Officer Ronald Frashour said he saw Campbell reach both hands around his waistband to get a gun, and so he shot Campbell in the back with an assault rifle. The jury acquitted the police officer with no criminal wrongdoing.

    Victor Steen
    17-year-old Victor Steen died when he fled from police, was tasered, crashed his bicycle and was run over by police cruiser. Steen committed a simple traffic violation while riding his bike. The deadly incident was captured on video. The officers were acquitted of any criminal wrongdoing.

    Ronald Madison and James Brissette

    In 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, five officers opened fire on an unarmed family on the east side of the Danziger Bridge, killing 17-year-old James Brissette and wounding four others. Next, officers shot at brothers Lance and Ronald Madison. Ronald, a 40-year-old man with severe mental disabilities, was running away when he was hit, and an officer stomped on and kicked him before he died. In a federal criminal trial, five officers involved in what have become known as the “Danziger Bridge Shootings” were convicted of various civil rights violations, but not murder.

    Oscar Grant

    On New Years morning, 2009, three Bay Area Rapid Transit officers pulled 22-year-old Oscar Grant and four other black men off a train in Oakland. You can view what happened afterwards in this Youtube video. In it, former-transit officer Mehserle can be seen shooting Grant in the back. During the trial, Mehserle argued that he thought Grant was reaching for a gun near his waistband. To stop this from happening, Mehserle said he intended to Tase him, but shot him with a pistol instead. He was sentenced to two years in prison and served 11 months.

    Jordan Davis

    On Nov. 23, an unarmed, 17-year-old Jordan Davis, was shot and killed by Michael Dunn after an argument over loud rap music. Dunn, 46, Davis through the window of a sport utility vehicle at a Jacksonville convenience store gas station before driving away, authorities say.Officials say Dunn parked next to the vehicle where Davis was sitting with three other teens. Dunn complained about the loud music and they started arguing. Dunn told police he thought he saw a gun and fired eight or nine shots into the vehicle. N He is charged with first degree murder.

     Kenneth Chamberlain

    On November 19, 2011, after his Life Aid medical alert necklace was inadvertently triggered, police came to Chamberlain’s home and demanded that he open his front door. Despite his objections and statements that he did not need help, the police broke down Chamberlain’s door, tasered him, and then shot him dead. Chamberlain was a 68-year-old, African-American, retired former-Marine, and a 20-year veteran of the Westchester County Department of Corrections. He wore the medical alert bracelet due to a chronic heart problem. A grand jury reviewed the case and decided that no criminal charge would be made against police officers involved in the killing.

    Abner Louiama

     30-year-old Haitian immigrant, Abner Louima, was arrested and sodomized with a broomstick inside a restroom in the 70th Precinct station house in Brooklyn. The case became a national symbol of police brutality and fed perceptions that New York City police officers were harassing or abusing young black men as part a citywide crackdown on crime. One officer, Justin A. Volpe, admitted in court in May 1999 that he had rammed a broken broomstick into Mr. Louima’s rectum and then thrust it in his face. He said he had mistakenly believed that Mr. Louima had punched him in the head during a street brawl outside a nightclub in Flatbush, but he acknowledged that he had also intended to humiliate the handcuffed immigrant. He left the force and was later sentenced to 30 years in prison. The commanders of the 70th Precinct were replaced within days of the assault. As the legal case wore on, Charles Schwarz, a former police officer, was sentenced in federal court in 2002 to five years in prison for perjury stemming from the torture case. A jury found that Mr. Schwarz had lied when he testified that he had not taken Mr. Louima to the station house bathroom where the assault took place.

    Kimani Gray

    16-year-old Kimani was shot four times in the front and side of his body and three times in the back by two New York City police officers as he left a friend’s birthday party in Brooklyn on March 9, 2013. The only publicly identified eyewitness is standing by her claim that he was empty-handed when he was gunned down.

     Kendrec McDade

    19-year-old college student McDade was shot and killed in March 2012 when officers responded to a report of an armed robbery of a man in Pasadena, Calif. He was later found to be unarmed, with only a cellphone in his pocket. His death has prompted his family to file a lawsuit, in which McDade’s parents argue that he was left on the street for a prolonged period of time without receiving first aid. According to court documents, McDade’s last words were, “Why did they shoot me?” The officers involved were initially placed on paid administrative leave but have since returned to duty.

    Timothy Russell

    Russell and his passenger, Malissa Williams, were killed in Cleveland after police officers fired 137 rounds into their car after a chase in December 2012. Officers said they saw a possible weapon, but no weapon or shell casings were found in the fleeing car or along the chase route. 

    Steven Washington

    Washington was shot by gang-enforcement officers Allan Corrales and George Diego in Los Angeles one night in 2010 after he approached them and appeared to remove something from his waistband. The officers said they’d heard a loud sound in the area and the 27-year-old, who was autistic, was looking around suspiciously. No weapon was ever recovered.

    Alonzo Ashley

    Police say that 29-year-old Ashley refused to stop splashing water from a drinking fountain on his face at the Denver Zoo one hot day in 2011, then made irrational comments and threw a trash can. The responding officers, who didn’t dispute that he was unarmed, killed him with a Taser, saying he had “extraordinary strength.” No criminal charges were filed against them.

    Wendell Allen

    Allen was fatally shot in the chest by officers executing a warrant on his house on March 7, 2012, in New Orleans. The 20-year-old was unarmed, and five children were home at the time of his death. Police found 4.5 ounces of marijuana on Allen after they killed him. An attorney for the family says that New Orleans police are investigating whether Officer Joshua Colclough was wrong to pull the trigger.

    Travares McGill

    In 2005 in Sanford, Fla. (the same county in which Travyon Martin was killed), the 16-year-old was killed by two security guards, one of whom testified that Travares was trying to hit him with his car. But evidence showed that the bullet that killed the teen hit him in the middle of the back and that the guard kept firing even after the car was no longer headed toward him.

    Ramarley Graham

    18-year-old Ramarley Graham was shot and killed in February of 2012, when Officer Richard Haste and his partner followed Graham into his grandmother’s apartment where Graham was attempting to flush a bag of marijuana down the toilet. Haste fatally shot Graham, who was unarmed, in the chest. The officers did not have a warrant to be inside the home. A Bronx judge later tossed out an indictment against the NYPD cop. No weapon was ever uncovered from the scene.

    Tyrone Brown 

    32-year-old former Marine from East Baltimore, Tyrone Brown was shot 12 times in a crowded bar after an off-duty Baltimore police officer fires 13 rounds at him for groping one of the officer’s lady friend’s. That officer, Gahiji Tshamba, was indicted for murder and faces a maximum life in prison charge if convicted. Tshamba was sentenced to 15 years in prison.

     
     
  13. peopleofcolorinlove:



Feature films, independent films, short films, and yes even B films. This masterpost has been created to showcase the stories of people of color, who love, laugh, cry, and kick ass. This is by no means the end all list of movies featuring people of color, there are thousands of great films out there, this is just a snippet of films found for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy.
 .D R A M A S.
Things Never Said (2013) 
La Mission (2009) 1 & 2 
Mississippi Masala (1991) 
Unbowed (1999) 
Love and Basketball (2000)
The Joy Luck Club (1993)
Samson and Delilah (2009)
The Last Fall (2012)
Not Easily Broken (2009)
Disappearing Acts (2000)
Mabo (2012)
42 (2013)
Jason’s Lyric (1994)
My Family (1995)
Dangerous Liaisons (2012)
.R O M C O M S.
Our Family Wedding (2010) 
About Last Night (2014
American Fusion (2005)
Think Like A Man (2012)
Jumping the Broom (2011)
Baggage Claim (2013)
Politics of Love (2008)
Peeples (2013)
Deliver Us From Eva (2003)
Just Wright (2010)
Hitch (2005)
It’s a Wonderful Afterlife (2010)
Fakin da Funk (1997)
Chasing Papi (2003)
Hasee Toh Phasee (2014) 
.D R A M A D I E S.
Brown Sugar (2002) BM/BW
I Can Do Bad All By Myself (2009) LM/BW
The Best Man (1999)
The Best Man Holiday (2013)
The Preacher’s Wife (1996) 
I LIke it Like That (1994)
Soul Food (1997)
Why Did I Get Married? (2007)
Why Did I Get Married Too (2010)
Waiting to Exhale (1995)
Last Holiday (2006)
.R O M A N C E.
Love Jones (1999)
Poetic Justice (1993)
Rodgers & Hammerstein’s Cinderella (1998)
How Stella Got Her Groove Back (1998)
Claudine (1974)
Paris Blues (1961) 
One Love (2003)
Their Eyes Were Watching God (2005)
Turning 30 (2011)
In the Mood for Love (2000)
Like Water for Chocolate (1992) 
.A C T I O N/.T H R I L L E R.
Romeo Must Die (2000)
Ninja Assassin (2009)
Woman Thou Art Loosed On the 7th Day
The Last Letter (2013)
Obsessed (2009)
.L G B T  F I L M S.
Saving Face
Noah’s Arc Jumping the Broom (2008)
Finding Me (2009)
Circumstances (2011)
Gun Hill Road (2011)
The Skinny (2012) 
Drifting Flower
Round Trip 
Elliot Loves (2012)
.S H O R T S.
Tall Enough (2009) 
Love Escapes Us (2014)
This Time (2010)
Dragon of Love (2003)
White Sugar in a Black Pot (2012)
.A N I M AT I O N.
Lilo & Stitch (2002)
Princess and the Frog (2009)
The Prince of Egypt (1998)
Mulan (1998)
Mulan II (2004)
Aladdin (1992)
The Emperor’s New Groove (2000)

    peopleofcolorinlove:

    Feature films, independent films, short films, and yes even B films. This masterpost has been created to showcase the stories of people of color, who love, laugh, cry, and kick ass. This is by no means the end all list of movies featuring people of color, there are thousands of great films out there, this is just a snippet of films found for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy.

    .D R A M A S.

    .R O M C O M S.

    .D R A M A D I E S.

    .R O M A N C E.

    .A C T I O N/.T H R I L L E R.

    .L G B T  F I L M S.

    .S H O R T S.

    .A N I M AT I O N.

     
     
  14. lochaberaxe:

    radicalqueerbrownboy:

    Canary Smiling

    What’s this amine?

    Hunter x Hunter

    (Source: paristanhill)

     
     
  15. putahilton:

gay sex is so weird

    putahilton:

    gay sex is so weird

    (Source: omg-humor)