Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

My Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  1. salviprince:

    "Soy cholo  rock n’ roll" 

    "una selfie de espejo, con flash, con cuatro personas… porque YOLO."

    I can’t with this guy, he’s too cute.

     
     
  2. bricksandmortarandchewinggum:

    holdmypurse:

    Remember when Romney lost the election so somebody created White People Mourning Romney and collected various people crying over Romney’s loss

    Still so funny.

    crackers cried cause they didnt want a black man running their white (system of a) country.

     
     
  3. gailsimone:

    america-wakiewakie:

    1. Single moms are the problem. Only 9 percent of low-income, urban moms have been single throughout their child’s first five years. Thirty-five percent were married to, or in a relationship with, the child’s father for that entire time.

    2. Absent dads are the problem. Sixty percent of low-income dads see at least one of their children daily. Another 16 percent see their children weekly.

    3. Black dads are the problem. Among men who don’t live with their children, black fathers are more likely than white or Hispanic dads to have a daily presence in their kids’ lives.

    4. Poor people are lazy. In 2004, there was at least one adult with a job in 60 percent of families on food stamps that had both kids and a nondisabled, working-age adult.

    5. If you’re not officially poor, you’re doing okay. The federal poverty line for a family of two parents and two children in 2012 was $23,283. Basic needs cost at least twice that in 615 of America’s cities and regions.

    6. Go to college, get out of poverty. In 2012, about 1.1 million people who made less than $25,000 a year, worked full time, and were heads of household had a bachelor’s degree.

    7. We’re winning the war on poverty. The number of households with children living on less than $2 a day per person has grown 160 percent since 1996, to 1.65 million families in 2011.

    8. The days of old ladies eating cat food are over. The share of elderly single women living in extreme poverty jumped 31 percent from 2011 to 2012.

    9. The homeless are drunk street people. One in 45 kids in the United States experiences homelessness each year. In New York City alone, 22,000 children are homeless.

    10. Handouts are bankrupting us. In 2012, total welfare funding was 0.47 percent of the federal budget.

    Reblog a thousand times.

    I have been poor. I have lived in serious poverty. 

    I worked as hard then as I do now, and I work very hard indeed, as did almost everyone else I knew who was poor, regardless of background, ethnicity, or marriage status. 

    We all know these things the wealthy and entitled say are lies…why do we allow that to continue to be the narrative?

     
     
  4. carlosofthecosmos:

    pluralfloral:

    de-la-souls:

    carlosofthecosmos:

    carlosofthecosmos:

    carlos does the accent challenge, y’all
    featuring food, laughter, cats & a “be nice” sweater

    just fast forward to 3:00

    such a delightful human

    my favorite part is the existential crisis of vamp v wizard

    i just listened to fin’s accent challenge so i wanted to reintroduce mine

     
     
  5.  
     
  6. marijaneistheway101:

    This song doe

    <3

     
     
  7. salvadoranarthistory:

Romeo Galdámez | 1956- | Salvadoran
Reflexiones de identidad | 1992 | Serigrafía

    salvadoranarthistory:

    Romeo Galdámez | 1956- | Salvadoran

    Reflexiones de identidad | 1992 | Serigrafía

     
     
  8. You're a radical queer brown boy.
    asked by Anonymous
    answer:

    Not only do I confirm it, I approve this message.

     
     
  9. Anonymously tell me your assumptions about me and I’ll confirm or deny them.

    (Source: personablesmile)

     
     
  10.  
     
  11. torogozando:

    reallykiwireally:

    Alfombras

    Semana Santa in El Salvador is really cool. This tradition involves groups of people creating carpets out of pigment or painted sawdust depicting religious iconography and some even have offerings.

     
     
  12. bestpal:

    identity is political whether we like it or not

    Hells yes so true.

     
     
  13.  
     
  14. (Source: bloggerslut)

     
     
  15. anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit


Fucking Christ! This.., I&#8217;m livid!

    anarcho-queer:

    Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

    In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

    The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

    Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

    In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

    Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

    In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

    California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

    Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

    Credit

    Fucking Christ! This.., I’m livid!