Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

My Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  1. tzoc-che:

sexrockerbilly:

thepeoplesrecord:

deadliestsnatch:

thepeoplesrecord:

Diana Martinez, 18, an undocumented student, was one of 12 arrested after refusing to leave their sit-in in the Hart Senate Office building.
An estimated 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools each year.

I need to know where these stats are coming from! Anyone?

We got it from here.

If I hadn’t have flown under the radar of white privilege, this would have been me right here. Seriously. I was undocumented.

^^^thank you! this is what people need to see and hear when they try the it’s a legality issue not a racial issue argument.

    tzoc-che:

    sexrockerbilly:

    thepeoplesrecord:

    deadliestsnatch:

    thepeoplesrecord:

    Diana Martinez, 18, an undocumented student, was one of 12 arrested after refusing to leave their sit-in in the Hart Senate Office building.

    An estimated 65,000 undocumented students graduate from U.S. high schools each year.

    I need to know where these stats are coming from! Anyone?

    We got it from here.

    If I hadn’t have flown under the radar of white privilege, this would have been me right here. Seriously. I was undocumented.

    ^^^thank you! this is what people need to see and hear when they try the it’s a legality issue not a racial issue argument.

     
     
  2. socialrupture:

    Disabled protesters clash with police over welfare demands — La Paz, Bolivia

    Scores of disabled people on crutches and in wheelchairs fought police in La Paz, Bolivia’s capital, over demands for better welfare support, injuring several and fuelling anger against the state.

    A caravan of about 50 adults and children ended a 1,000-mile, 100-day trek through Bolivia at the protest near government offices in La Paz on Thursday. Scuffles broke out and pepper spray was used after the group were blocked by riot police, who stopped them reaching the legislature and presidential palace to petitioning MPs and the presidential palace for a tripling of the £91 monthly state subsidy for disabled people. The protesters tried to break through the lines using their crutches and wheelchairs but were forced back in a melee in which several people were injured and four detained. The protest organisers then declared a hunger strike by 10 adults and a round-the-clock vigil by the rest.

    The clashes were another public relations PR fiasco for President Evo Morales, who has seen his once-huge popularity plunge amid protests from coca farmers, indigenous rights activists and environmentalists. Bolivia’s first indigenous leader swept to power in 2006 promising to ease poverty and inequality, and was hailed a saviour in his first few years. But marches on La Paz – notably one over a controversial Amazon road in October – illustrate the level of disenchantment.

    The disabled protesters relied on charity on their journey to the highland capital from Beni, bordering Brazil, in November. As well as higher subsidies, they want greater efforts to integrate them into a society that makes little provision for those with physical or mental disabilities.

    Domitila Franco, a wheelchair-user, said she struggled. “It’s very hard to be a person with a disability,” she said. “Even our own husbands abandon us because they feel ashamed of us. … I look after my four children alone, washing and ironing clothes for people.”

    The protesters to end their trek at Plaza Murillo, the heart of government, having seen other marches do so. “Why not us?” Camilo Bianchi, a protest leader, asked local media. “It’s a public space.”

    Carlos Romero, a government minister, told a press conference that opposition groups had infiltrated the march and it was necessary to block it. “There are other groups trying to politicise this, trying to create a climate of disorder and confrontation,” he said. “Our obligation is to secure Plaza Murillo.”

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/feb/24/disabled-protesters-clash-police-bolivia?newsfeed=true

     
     
  3. Eliva Alvarado, a campesina organizer and activist for land occupations and recoveries in Honduras has a brief documentary i stumbled upon today.  Recently finished reading her book “Don’t Be Afraid Gringo”. She’s one of the Latin@ American women that has been given little notice for her hard work.  

     
     
  4. tierracita:


Rooster was at an Immigrant youth rally fighting for his rights, Undocumented and unafraid. Him and  9 students were arrested at the action in San Bernardino.He sent a text to one of his friend’s asking help spread the word and if there is anything anyone can do to help him please inbox me with any information . He wants everyone to have undocumented pride and to not be afraid to speak up about your legal status in this country! Rooster is undocumented, queer, and unafraid of who he is.
Please reblog and help this go viral and bring attention to this issue. Watch his video and try to help him and any undocumented person living in this country.
 
“No more fear, no more injustice.
 No more laying against a mother fucking cactus. Time to mobilize and be set free, Time to do whats right regardless of the penalty. We will not surrender, We will not fall. Just want tell y’all I love you, my sister Babie most of all.”
-Ramon “Rooster” Valdivia

He’s a great hombre. Free Rooster! 

    tierracita:

    Rooster was at an Immigrant youth rally fighting for his rights, Undocumented and unafraid. Him and  9 students were arrested at the action in San Bernardino.He sent a text to one of his friend’s asking help spread the word and if there is anything anyone can do to help him please inbox me with any information . He wants everyone to have undocumented pride and to not be afraid to speak up about your legal status in this country! Rooster is undocumented, queer, and unafraid of who he is.

    Please reblog and help this go viral and bring attention to this issue. Watch his video and try to help him and any undocumented person living in this country.

     

    No more fear, no more injustice.

     No more laying against a mother fucking cactus.
    Time to mobilize and be set free,
    Time to do whats right regardless of the penalty.
    We will not surrender,
    We will not fall.
    Just want tell y’all I love you, my sister Babie most of all.

    -Ramon “Rooster” Valdivia

    He’s a great hombre. Free Rooster! 

    (Source: nih-nightmare)

     
     
  5. vegtablez:

    “You don’t come back in here until you’ve apologized to every person in this room, Because you just exercised a freedom that none of these people of color have. When these people of color get tired of racism, they can’t just walk out, because there’s no place in this country where they aren’t going to be exposed to racism. They can’t even stay in their own homes and not be exposed to racism if they turn on their television. But you, as a white female, when you get tired of being judged and treated unfairly on the basis of your eye color, you can walk out that door, and you know it won’t happen out there. You exercised a freedom they don’t have. If you’re going to be in here you’re going to apologize to every person of color in this room. And do it now.”

    “I’m sorry there’s racism in this country—

    “BULLSHIT! No, you’re not going to say ‘I’m sorry there’s racism.’ You’re going to apologize for what YOU just did.”

    “I will not apologize because it’s not a matter of race always—”

    “OUT.”

    Jane Elliot is a champ.

    HOLY MOLY, this is amazing!  I think this video, although outdated, is very powerful and useful to get an understanding of what covert racism looks like, how white privilege works and how entitlement is expressed. I love Ms. Jane Elliot’s tactics and knowledge of how oppression works.

     
     
  6. bradicalmang:

    This afternoon, Obama signed the controversial Defense authorization bill, despite his reservations about provisions related to the treatment of terrorism suspects. The National Journal reports:

    President Obama signed on Saturday the defense authorization bill, formally ending weeks of heated debate in Congress and intense lobbying by the administration to strip controversial provisions requiring the transfer of some terror suspects to military custody.

    “I have signed this bill despite having serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists,” Obama said in a statement accompanying his signature.

    The AP has more from the signing statement: “My administration will not authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American citizens. Indeed, I believe that doing so would break with our most important traditions and values as a nation.”

    Full text of Obama’s signing statement.

    See KIDS, RepubliCLANS and Democrats are all the same.  Shit’s getting serious.

     
     
  7. 60 plays
    Yolocamba I Ta
    Regalo para un Niño
    El Salvador: Su Pueblo, Su Lucha, Su Canto

    selucha:

    YOLOCAMBA I TA - REGALO PARA UN NIÑO [EL SALVADOR, 1975]

    “And in your dream which trembles fiercely, today I leave peace
    over your young world so that you may be surprised by death.”

    This is probably one of the best-known songs of the nueva canción tradition to come out of El Salvador, and was written by that country’s famous poet Oswaldo Escobar Velado likely around the early 1950s. Officially, this song and album is attributed to the Movimiento de la Cultura Popular, a mid-1970s collective of radical artists, though all but two of the songs are works of Yolocamba I Ta.

    Regalo para un Niño (Gift for a Child) is a truly beautiful, touching song to listen to, which really makes you remember who revolutionaries should always be fighting for. Especially in a country like El Salvador, whose civil war involved people of all ages in all capacities. Notice the reference to the Korean War also, which I find interesting. Anyway I think the lyrics speak for themselves so, without further ado, here it is! English translation at the bottom for your convenience :-).

    SPANISH:

    Te regalo una paz iluminada.
    Un racimo de paz y de gorriones.
    Una Holanda de mieses aromada.
    Y California de melocotones.

    Un Asia sin Corea ensangrentada.
    Una Corea en flor, otra en botones.
    Una América en frutos sazonada.
    Y un mundo con azúcar de melones,

    Te regalo la paz y su flor pura.
    Te regalo un clavel meditabundo
    para tu blanca mano de criatura.

    Y en tu sueño que tiembla estremecido
    hoy te dejo la paz sobre tu mundo
    de niño, por la muerte sorprendido

    A vos que sos la semilla del hombre nuevo,
    que no conoces la alegria del pan a tiempo
    que te toca morir sin ser el momento.
    Tu madre violada, tu padre asesinado,
    y vos viviendo en los montes,
    huyendo de la Guardia.
    En tus ojos, la profunda mirada de Farabundo;
    y en tu pecho, el rojo y el amarillo del pueblo.
    En vos expresa el dolor, el sufrimiento, la represion, la miseria.
    Vos nos inspiras para amar la paz
    y para hacer hoy la guerra.
    A vos te pertenece nuestra lucha,
    para vos nuestro fuerzo,
    para vos nuestra victoria.
    Veo tus ojos asombrados
    pero si hoy tenemos que empuñar las armas,
    es para que tu puedas jugar mañana en el patio.

    ENGLISH:

    I will give you an enlightened peace;
    a bouquet of peace and sparrows
    A Holland of aromatic harvests
    and a California of delicious peaches.

    An Asia without Korea drenched in blood,
    one Korea flowering, the other in bloom
    An America among seasoned fruit,
    and a world drizzled in the sugar of melons.

    I will give you peace and its pure flower
    I will give you a contemplative carnation
    for your white childlike hand.

    And in your dream which trembles fiercely
    today I leave peace over your young world
    so that you may be surprised by death.

    To you, who are the seed of the new man,
    who doesn’t know the happiness of daily bread
    when it is your turn to die, though not the right time
    Your mother violated, your father murdered,
    and you living in the mountains,
    fleeing from the National Guard.
    In your eyes, the profound gaze of Farabundo;
    and in your chest, the red and yellow of the people.
    Pain, suffering, repression, and misery are all expressed within you.
    You inspire us to love peace
    and today, to make war.
    To you belongs our struggle,
    for you all our effort,
    for you our victory.
    I see the wondrous look in your eyes
    but if today we have to take up arms,
    it is so that you can play tomorrow on your patio.

    I have heard stories of the civil war in El Salvador.  My mothers own accounts are half-told and secretive.  Folks who migrated here refuse to tell the new generation of these truths.  This song is but a glimpse.  

     
     
  8. newwavefeminism:

nickturse:


University students with their necks painted protest at Bolivar square in 	      Bogota, Colombia, Thursday Nov. 3, 2011. Their signs read in Spanish “We 	      have the right to be outraged,” left, and “Excellent education and for all!!” 	      Students are protesting education reforms planned by the government that 	      propose private funding for public institutions. (Fernando Vergara)


wow

AMAZING!!!

    newwavefeminism:

    nickturse:

    University students with their necks painted protest at Bolivar square in Bogota, Colombia, Thursday Nov. 3, 2011. Their signs read in Spanish “We have the right to be outraged,” left, and “Excellent education and for all!!” Students are protesting education reforms planned by the government that propose private funding for public institutions. (Fernando Vergara)

    wow

    AMAZING!!!

     
     
  9. "

    On this day, 50 years ago, Frantz Fanon passed away. A psychiatrist, Pan-Africanist, writer, and revolutionary, he was born in Martinique in 1925. In 1952 he published Black Skin, White Masks, which exposed the negative effects of colonization on the mental state of subjugated peoples.


    As a psychiatrist in Algeria, he joined the FLN (National Liberation Front), which waged a war of independence against France. In 1961, Fanon published The Wretched of the Earth, a book on decolonization that has remained a classic and influenced revolutionaries the world over, including Malcolm X, the Black Panthers, Che Guevara, and the South African Steve Biko, founder of the Black Consciousness movement. Fanon died in Maryland, where he had sought treatment for leukemia, and was buried in Algeria.

    "
     
     
  10. The Takeover: Top People of Color Occupations

    writinghistorywithoutapen:

    Native Takeover of Alcatraz

    Contrary to popular belief, occupations are not a new thing. In fact, Black and Brown communites have been in the foreground of taking shit over since the civil war. Here are the highlights.
     
     


    Fort Monroe- Fort Monroe was a Union garrison located in Virgina. Led by General Butler, Fort Monroe was a site of a major occupation when three Africans Frank Baker, James Townsend and Sheppard Mallory ran from their plantation to Fort Monroe to escape slavery. General Butler declared the three contraband and shielded them from their master who came to “retrieve his property.” Word spread about the men’s brave escape and within a week over 100 families came to Fort Monroe. There they established “contraband camps.”

    I Hotel- The International Hotel was one of the last remnants of San Francisco’s Filipino community. As a hub for working class immigrant families, it was targeted for demolition to expand San Francisco’s business district. Activists from “The Red Guards” ( a Asian group inspired by the Young Lords) and the Asian Community Center fought developers and helped rehab the aging hotel. In 1977 activists barricaded t themselves inside, but after two months of struggle, the city of San Francisco gained the upper hand and evicted the tenants from the I Hotel.

    Lincoln Hospital-Lincoln Hospital in the South Bronx was known as the “butcher shop.” Hundreds of people died there and staff was largely burnout from an uncaring administration. In 1970, members of the Young Lords, Black Panthers and Health Revolution Union Movement took over the public hospital. Based on a 10 point health program, the organizers set up a TB clinic and later established the first acupuncture  treatment center for heroin addiction (organized and led by Black Panther and Black Liberation Army member, Dr. Mutulu Shakur.)


    City College- Known as “White Rhodesia” the City College of the City University of New York with close to 95% white despite being located in Harlem. Black and Puerto Rican students led a two week long occupation and   strike at the school.The result was the establishment of Black Studies and open admission, a program guaranteeing  a free college education to any high school graduate in New York City.

    Alcatraz- Native American activists occupied the famed prison, once home to Al Capone and abandoned by the federal government. The occupiers demanded the land to establish Native American institutions. During the 19 month occupation, sympathizers sent food and supplies by boat while activists slept in cells. At one point, the leadership offered to sell back Alcatraz to the government for $24, a tongue in cheek reference to Manhattan Island.


    Weinstein Hall, NYU- Little know (or recognized) in the Stonewall Rebellion that launched gay liberation, was the role of Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Riveria. These two transgender activists were on the leading edge of the rebellion, battling the police, and coining the term “Whose Streets, Our Streets!”.
    Johnson and Rivera later lead the takeover of Weinstein Hall at New York University after the campus cancelled gay dancing there. Rivera said ““All we fought for at Weinstein Hall was lost when we left upon the request of the pigs…. You people run if you want to, but we’re tired of running. We intend to fight for our rights until we get them.”

    Statue of Liberty- Watch the crown! Puerto Rican activists took over lady liberty, unfurled the national flag and demanded freedom for political prisoners. The action, 1 year after United States bicentennial, renewed focus on the colonial status of Puerto Rico. One year later, Jimmy Carter released five of the main Puerto Rican political prisoners.

    Birmingham Bus-Occupation usually means a crowd but on Dec.1 1955, one was all that was needed to set off the civil rights/ Black Power movement. Rosa Parks a tireless organizer refused to give up her seat on a rush hour bus. The action lead to the Birmingham bus boycott and the rest is people’s history…

     
     
  11. daniellemertina:

breakingzeemold:

Troy Davis

Never ever forget.

    daniellemertina:

    breakingzeemold:

    Troy Davis

    Never ever forget.

     
     
  12. October 12th : Indigenous Resistance Day

    Día de la Raza: 

    The date Columbus arrived in the Americas is celebrated in many countries in Latin America. The most common name for the celebration in Spanish (including in some Latino communities in the United States) is the Día de la Raza (“day of the race” or “day of the [hispanic] people”), commemorating the first encounters of Europeans and Native Americans. The day was first celebrated in Argentina in 1917, Venezuelaand Colombia in 1921, Chile in 1922, and Mexico in 1928. The day was also celebrated under this title in Spain until 1957, when it was changed to the Día de la Hispanidad (“Hispanity Day”), and in Venezuela until 2002, when it was changed to the Día de la Resistencia Indígena (Day of Indigenous Resistance). Originally conceived of as a celebration of Hispanic influence in the Americas, as evidenced by the complementary celebrations in Spain and Latin America, Día de la Raza has come to be seen by some in Latin America as a counter to Columbus Day; a celebration of the resistance against the arrival of Europeans to the Americas and of the native races and cultures.

    In the U.S. Día de la Raza has served as a time of mobilization for pan-ethnic Latino activists, particularly in the 1960s. Since then, La Raza has served as a periodic rallying cry for Hispanic activists. The first Hispanic March on Washington occurred on Columbus Day in 1996. The name has remained in the largest Hispanic social justice organization, the National Council of La Raza.

     
     
  13. tranquality:

so-treu:

notyourkinddear:

baconisbetterthanbacon:

danceswithfaeriesunderthemoon:

stuish:

cheguevaraslovechild:

The Smile of Hope
This is a picture of a little 13-year-old girl arrested during the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest on the  Brooklyn Bridge.
The picture tells us something very important, with brutal clarity. When the police are out on the streets arresting  13-year-old kids for peacefully protesting political issues then we  know beyond argument something is terminally rotten in America.
It tells us that there is hope too, though. The spark of freedom  that flickered in the middle-east during the Arab Spring is being  re-ignited all over in America. People are waking up from the long, bad  dream. They are seeing the lies and exploitation and hypocrisy all around them and saying ‘Enough’.
The battles to be fought are formidable, the forces ranged  against us are frightening, but now at least we have hope that a better America, and a better world, is  possible. 
Ellie

JP Morgan has also made a massive, $4.6 million dollar donation to the NYPD today. Such a strange coincidence. http://theelitist.net/nypd-receives-jp-morgan-donation-mass-arrest-of-protesters-at-occupywallstreet
Thanks to reddit user emptyhunter

I love how her smile is all like
“idgaf bruh.”

Gir hat girl is a fucking badass.

I would only add that it would be more appropriate to say that we know there’s something rotten when WHITE 13-year old kids are being arrested for peaceful protest. Brown & Black kids get arrested for peaceful protests, or just for being in public, every day.

this makes me want to break things. america isn’t rotten when a 7 year old black girl is shot in the head by the police who were showing off for a tv show, america isn’t rotten when a 9 year old latina girl is shot by a supremacist vigilante posing as law enforcement, but let a little white girl get put in handcuffs and the whole world is ready to riot. 
and yes, i’m fucking bitter. bite me.

^^^^^^^^^^

    tranquality:

    so-treu:

    notyourkinddear:

    baconisbetterthanbacon:

    danceswithfaeriesunderthemoon:

    stuish:

    cheguevaraslovechild:

    The Smile of Hope

    This is a picture of a little 13-year-old girl arrested during the ‘Occupy Wall Street’ protest on the Brooklyn Bridge.

    The picture tells us something very important, with brutal clarity. When the police are out on the streets arresting 13-year-old kids for peacefully protesting political issues then we know beyond argument something is terminally rotten in America.

    It tells us that there is hope too, though. The spark of freedom that flickered in the middle-east during the Arab Spring is being re-ignited all over in America. People are waking up from the long, bad dream. They are seeing the lies and exploitation and hypocrisy all around them and saying ‘Enough’.

    The battles to be fought are formidable, the forces ranged against us are frightening, but now at least we have hope that a better America, and a better world, is possible. 

    Ellie

    JP Morgan has also made a massive, $4.6 million dollar donation to the NYPD today. Such a strange coincidence. http://theelitist.net/nypd-receives-jp-morgan-donation-mass-arrest-of-protesters-at-occupywallstreet

    Thanks to reddit user emptyhunter

    I love how her smile is all like

    “idgaf bruh.”

    Gir hat girl is a fucking badass.

    I would only add that it would be more appropriate to say that we know there’s something rotten when WHITE 13-year old kids are being arrested for peaceful protest. Brown & Black kids get arrested for peaceful protests, or just for being in public, every day.

    this makes me want to break things. america isn’t rotten when a 7 year old black girl is shot in the head by the police who were showing off for a tv show, america isn’t rotten when a 9 year old latina girl is shot by a supremacist vigilante posing as law enforcement, but let a little white girl get put in handcuffs and the whole world is ready to riot. 

    and yes, i’m fucking bitter. bite me.

    ^^^^^^^^^^

     
     
  14. (I really recommend you all to go to this.  Eric Stanley is pretty dope.)

    Come celebrate the release of Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press)

    A night of reading, discussion, and conspiring!

    Pathologized, terrorized, and confined, trans/gender non-conforming and queer folks have always struggled against the enormity of the prison industrial complex. The first collection of its kind, Eric A. Stanley and Nat Smith bring together current and former prisoners, activists, and academics to offer new ways for understanding how race, gender, ability, and sexuality are lived under the crushing weight of captivity. Through a politic of gender self-determination, this collection argues that trans/queer liberation and prison abolition must be grown together. From rioting against police violence and critiquing hate crimes legislation to prisoners demanding access to HIV medications, and far beyond, Captive Genders is a challenge for us all to join the struggle.

    with:
    Eric A. Stanley works at the intersections of radical trans/queer politics, theories of state violence, and visual culture. Eric co-edited Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, 2011) and along with Chris Vargas, directed the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2011).

    Ralowe T. Ampu is the seductive fragrance wafting through milieus of unbridled danger and intrigue. Yes, whether it be outing gay Castro realtors as AIDS profiteers with ACT UP and GAY SHAME or trying to free the New Jersey 4, or prevent the non-profit management company in her SRO from killing her neighbors, Ralowe is there. 

    Reina Gossett lives in Brooklyn & works at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project supporting SRLP’s membership and community organizing work. She believes creativity & imagination are crucial for growing strong communities and practicing self-determination. 

    Toshio Meronek is on the editorial collective for The Abolitionist, Critical Resistance’s newspaper and runs whereslulu.com, a website on disability and popular culture. 

    Michelle Potts is a PhD student in the department of Rhetoric at UC Berkeley. Her work looks at the intersections of labour, race and health. She lives in Oakland, CA.

    Kimma Walker lives in East Orange, NJ and is the PROUD MOTHER of Terrain Dandridge who is one of the New Jersey 4. http://freenj4.wordpress.c
    om/

    Event cosponsored by Counterpublic NYC and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project

    Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, Oakland, CA) Eric A. Stanley, Nat Smith (eds.)

    http://bluestockings.com/d
    irections/

    http://captivegenders.net/

     
     
  15. "Person of color" = someone discriminated against for their race/ethnicity on a systematic level by the white majority

    creatrixtiara:

    downlo:

    (Inspired by the commentary on this post)

    For the purposes of anti-racism struggles, that’s all you need to go by.

    Yes, the term, “colored” is not normally associated with Asian people these days, but it was definitely used to label people of Asian descent in this country in the past. We have been and still are the targets of White racism:


    Believing the fallacy that people of Asian descent are not authentically or legitimately ‘Colored’ or ‘People of Color’ is wrong because:

    1) It ignores the long history of racial discrimination and persecution of Asians in the U.S. (e.g. the Chinese Exclusion Acts, the Japanese-American internment during WWII, explicit campaigns to drive Asians out of the American West, the lynching of Asian Americans. (Which is something that is not commonly known due to the fact that many Asian and Mexican victims of mob violence in the 19th c. were classified as ‘White’ in official records*)

    2) It ignores the history of White European imperialism in Asian countries, which intersects with White racism against Asian immigrants in White-majority countries. I assure you that White imperialists certainly did not view Indians, Chinese, or Vietnamese as being anything other than ‘Colored’

    Imperial map of Asia, source of map

    European man receiving pedicure from South Asian servants

    White European man receiving a pedicure from South Asian servants

    3) It plays into the White racist divide-and-conquer strategy.

    Even a brief look at the history of race/ethnicity in U.S. law alone makes it apparent that a key aspect of White racism has been the classification of non-Whites according to (white-defined) categories.

    Those hailing from Asia (as well as the Middle East, the Caribbean, and Latin America) have been legally categorized in a myriad of ways—very occasionally as White, but more often as non-White (e.g. Ozawa v. United States, United States v. Thind). In general, Asians have occupied a strange ethno-racial limbo as ‘Other’ (e.g. the Census prior to 1870). As far as Whites were concerned, Asians might not have been ‘Negros’, but we certainly weren’t White either. Our otherness made us targets for discrimination and violence, and—because our right to citizenship has constantly come under attack—we’ve historically had as little recourse to the protection of the law as African Americans have.

    Massacre of the Chinese at Rock Springs, Wyoming

    Massacre of the Chinese at White Springs, Wyoming (source)

    Yes, Asian people have (somewhat more recently than you think) enjoyed certain perks due to our ethnicity/race compared to Black and AmerIndian people (e.g. ‘the model minority’). But that’s just a more recent aspect of the divide-and-conquer strategy, which the White hegemony has used to pit minorities against each other so as to distract us from the real problems facing our communities.

    And yes, some Asian people are complete racist dicks to those who aren’t Asian or White, but that’s internalized White racism. If you’ve been kicked and beaten by your master for years, then suddenly given a few scraps from his table, would you throw them in his face? Or is it more likely that—as beaten down as you are—you’d give in to Stockholm Syndrome and play along? (To be clear: that’s an explanation for Asian racism, not an excuse.)

    Even so, incidents of Anti-Asian bias (e.g. Vincent Chin, Wen Ho Lee) and straight-up racist violence occur frequently enough these days that Asians are hyper-aware of the fact that many—including non-whites—don’t view us as Americans, let alone ‘Colored’. We’re simply foreign ‘others’.

    So if White is grudgingly treating you OK, while Black and Brown seem to hate and distrust you, then whom do you ally yourself with? More importantly, who benefits from this apparent alliance?

    In the American black-white paradigm of race relations, ‘others’ like Asians get shit on no matter which side we’re on. So the Asian internalization of White racism makes a twisted kind of sense as a survival strategy, particularly if your natural allies (other victims of White racism) are treating you like foreigners and even equating you with the oppressor himself. 

    My point: Asians’ conflicted, sometimes tense, relations with African Americans and those who have been historically, categorically considered ‘Colored’ is an artifact of White racism. This means that if you exclude Asians from ‘Colored’ solidarity against White racism, you are reproducing a highly successful strategy of White racism.

    Let that sink in for a minute.

    To conclude: Anti-Asian exclusion from POC solidarity movements is ignorant, wrong, and just plain stupid. Asians’s current role as a prop of White racial supremacy is not our doing, just as our historic role as the foreign ‘Other’ is not our doing. The peculiar place of Asians in race relations today has been the result of the intersection of White racism, xenophobia, and imperialism. It is a mistake to think otherwise.  

    TL;DR: Questioning the identity of Asians as “people of color” reinforces White racial supremacy.

    I love you.