Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

A Guanaco's Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  2. Hands down, one of the best pupusas I’ve had in my life i had today (the best being my Tia Reyna’s and second best from Carmelinas in Uniondale ny). I went with Carlos and Manuel to El Pulgarcito 15 minutes south of Atl. Im dumb founded at how amazing they were. Huge servings too. I had two and felt like I had 6. New York Salvies; you dont know what you’re missing.

    Hands down, one of the best pupusas I’ve had in my life i had today (the best being my Tia Reyna’s and second best from Carmelinas in Uniondale ny). I went with Carlos and Manuel to El Pulgarcito 15 minutes south of Atl. Im dumb founded at how amazing they were. Huge servings too. I had two and felt like I had 6. New York Salvies; you dont know what you’re missing.

     
     
  3. dreamsurreal:snowyowlwhitecotton:


Peru has officially passed a law banning genetically modified ingredients anywhere within the country for the next ten years.

If only we were smart enough to follow

    dreamsurreal:snowyowlwhitecotton:

    Peru has officially passed a law banning genetically modified ingredients anywhere within the country for the next ten years.

    If only we were smart enough to follow

     
     
  4. nuestrahermana:

Platanos fritos con frijoles y crema!

the breakfast of champions!  you’ll find this meal in any salvadoran household.

    nuestrahermana:

    Platanos fritos con frijoles y crema!

    the breakfast of champions!  you’ll find this meal in any salvadoran household.

     
     
  5. matchstickmolly:

    The Eat Seasonably Calendar

    I’m gonna give this a try, see how it works for me.

     
     
  6. rawlivingfoods:

    raw-vegan:

    Simple Instructions on Sprouting and Soaking Nuts and Seeds

    If you’ve started reading raw cookbooks, you’ve probably noticed that soaking nuts and seeds is a pretty common practice!

    The main reason soaking nuts and seeds is so important is because they contain enzyme inhibitors.

    The purpose of these enzyme inhibitors is to protect the nut or seed until it has what it needs for growing.

    Nature allowed the inhibitors and toxic substances to be easily removed when the conditions (enough rain and sun) were met.

    In nature, when it rains the nut gets enough moisture so it can germinate and produce a plant. The plant then continues to grow with the sunlight.

    By soaking nuts and seeds, you release these toxic enzyme inhibitors AND increase the life and vitality contained within them!

    The Benefits of Soaking Nuts and Seeds

    Enzyme inhibitors get neutralized.

    The amount of vitamins your body can absorb increases.

    Gluten breaks down so digestion is much easier.

    Phytic acid, which inhibits the absorption of vital minerals, is reduced.

    Soaking times vary with the nut. Generally the more dense the nut, the longer the soaking time. Ideally, soaking should be done at room temperature.

    Soaking Nuts and Seeds

    Gather your raw, organic nuts or seeds.

    Rinse them in purified or distilled water.

    Place them in a glass or stainless steel bowl.

    Cover with twice as much water as the nuts or seeds. (1 cup of nuts to 2 cups of water).

    Cover the bowl with something breathable like a cloth towel.

    Drain and rinse the nuts or seeds every 3 or 4 hours.

    The soak water will contain the enzyme inhibitors which is very acidic to the body so make sure to rinse your nuts and seeds well.

    Sprouting Nuts and Seeds

    Follow the process above for soaking nuts and seeds.

    Place the soaked and rinsed nuts or seeds in a sprouting jar. You can get this online or at a health food store.

    Cover the jar with screening, cheesecloth, or sprouting lids.

    Put the jar face down, at an angle in a low light place. A dish rack or a high rimmed bowl works well because it allows the excess water to drain out.

    Rinse every 8 hours. To rinse: Fill jar with water. Shake vigorously. Drain. Repeat 2-3 times.

    Make sure you drain the jar well. Seeds
    that sit in water can spoil the whole jar!

    Once sprouting begins, place in a sun lit area. Don’t place in direct sunlight though. Continue to rinse every 8 hours.

    Let the sprouts grow for the suggested number of days.

    After the final rinse, let the sprouts dry completely! They should be dry to the touch. This is very important! Refrigerated produce dies quickly.

    The sprouts can then be stored in the refrigerator for up to 6 weeks.

     
     
  7. vegangirls:

    Photographer Glenn Thomas is doing a short project where he eats his meals vegan, and he eats them cheap. Showing it’s not only possible, but easy. Take that, privilege police.

     
     


  8. (Source: badassmexicans)

     
     
  9. decimare:

    Halloween>everything else

    (Source: wickedwayoflife)

     
     
  10. Salvadoran Food - Pupusas 101 
A pupusa, which is a Pipil word - pronounced pupusaw, is a traditional Salvadoran dish made of thick, hand-made corn tortilla that is filled with the following: cheese (queso, usually a soft cheese called Quesillo), and/or cooked pork meat ground to a paste consistency (called chicharrón, not to be confused with fried pork rind), and/or refried beans (frijoles refritos), and/or queso con loroco (loroco is a vine flower). The two most common pupusas are the pupusa de queso (cheese) and more popular pupusa revuelta with mixed ingredients of cheese, beans and the pork paste.  Pupusas are served with curtido, a pickled cabbage salad fermented in vinegar and a runny and savory tomato sauce.
 
Pupusas are similar to the South American arepa. However, the main difference lies in that the pupusa is made out of nixtamal, whereas arepas are made out of ordinary corn dough. Nixtamal is basically the same corn dough, but it has undergone a preparation process involving an alkaline solution before cooking, which contributes to peel the grains while preserving valuable nutrients. This process was developed in Mesoamerica around 1500 - 1200 BC. Early mesoamericans used quicklime or slaked lime and ashes as the alkaline solution.

    Salvadoran Food - Pupusas 101 

    pupusa, which is a Pipil word - pronounced pupusaw, is a traditional Salvadoran dish made of thick, hand-made corn tortilla that is filled with the following: cheese (queso, usually a soft cheese called Quesillo), and/or cooked pork meat ground to a paste consistency (called chicharrón, not to be confused with fried pork rind), and/or refried beans (frijoles refritos), and/or queso con loroco (loroco is a vine flower). The two most common pupusas are the pupusa de queso (cheese) and more popular pupusa revuelta with mixed ingredients of cheese, beans and the pork paste.  Pupusas are served with curtido, a pickled cabbage salad fermented in vinegar and a runny and savory tomato sauce.

    Pupusas are similar to the South American arepa. However, the main difference lies in that the pupusa is made out of nixtamal, whereas arepas are made out of ordinary corn dough. Nixtamal is basically the same corn dough, but it has undergone a preparation process involving an alkaline solution before cooking, which contributes to peel the grains while preserving valuable nutrients. This process was developed in Mesoamerica around 1500 - 1200 BC. Early mesoamericans used quicklime or slaked lime and ashes as the alkaline solution.

     
     
  11. lovedomidee:

thunderrcunt:

nomnomnom
im eating these right now 
one of my favorite parts of summer and Puerto Rico. 10x better in Puerto Rico

O___O !

Mamones!

    lovedomidee:

    thunderrcunt:

    nomnomnom

    im eating these right now

    one of my favorite parts of summer and Puerto Rico. 10x better in Puerto Rico

    O___O !

    Mamones!

     
     
  12. ELOTE LOCO!!!

    ELOTE LOCO!!!

     
     
  13. ceruleansmiles:

Home made Strawberry Parfaits &Tumblr with the homiee. <3.

Made some strawberry parfaits with my friends, such a good idea cause it hit the right spot. 

    ceruleansmiles:

    Home made Strawberry Parfaits &Tumblr with the homiee. <3.

    Made some strawberry parfaits with my friends, such a good idea cause it hit the right spot. 

     
     
  14. (via flyingscatteredthoughts)

OMG!  I haven&#8217;t had a salvadoran quesadilla in forever!  This made me miss my great aunt&#8217;s baking. I love mama martha&#8217;s food so much&#8230;  I remember going into the kitchen as a 5 year old and smell her making the usual rice and beans, some hand made tortillas and her authentic salvadoran dishes.  Punche en salsa de Alguashte, Pupusas, Casamiento, Nuegados de Yuca, Atol de Elote, Tamales de Elote, Arroz en Leche, Empanadas de Platanos Dulces&#8230; And i can go on for days.  I wanna learn those recipes, especially the quesadillas. &lt;3

    (via flyingscatteredthoughts)

    OMG!  I haven’t had a salvadoran quesadilla in forever!  This made me miss my great aunt’s baking. I love mama martha’s food so much…  I remember going into the kitchen as a 5 year old and smell her making the usual rice and beans, some hand made tortillas and her authentic salvadoran dishes.  Punche en salsa de Alguashte, Pupusas, Casamiento, Nuegados de Yuca, Atol de Elote, Tamales de Elote, Arroz en Leche, Empanadas de Platanos Dulces… And i can go on for days.  I wanna learn those recipes, especially the quesadillas. <3