Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

My Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  1. corigami:

badassmexicans:

AZTLAN
BAM

oregon should be in there as well. Aztlan extended well into the southern tip of the Willamette Valley and many people in Ashland are indigenous mexican@s that never immigrated there but are from that area. 

    corigami:

    badassmexicans:

    AZTLAN

    BAM

    oregon should be in there as well. Aztlan extended well into the southern tip of the Willamette Valley and many people in Ashland are indigenous mexican@s that never immigrated there but are from that area. 

     
     
  2. Do not accept Columbus Day as a holiday. This “holiday” celebrates genocide of entire cultures, people and nations. Reconsider Columbus Day.

     
     
  3. Assimilation

     
     
  4. cuntymint:

 
Recognizing an urgent need for Indigenous liberation strategies, Indigenous intellectuals met to create a book with hands-on suggestions and activities to enable Indigenous communities to decolonize themselves. The authors begin with the belief that Indigenous Peoples have the power, strength, and intelligence to develop culturally specific decolonization strategies for their own communities and thereby systematically pursue their own liberation. These scholars and writers demystify the language of colonization and decolonization to help Indigenous communities identify useful concepts, terms, and intellectual frameworks in their struggles toward liberation and self-determination. This handbook covers a wide range of topics, including Indigenous governance, education, language, oral tradition, repatriation, images and stereotypes, and truth-telling. It aims to facilitate critical thinking while offering recommendations for fostering community discussions and plans for meaningful community action.

    cuntymint:

    Recognizing an urgent need for Indigenous liberation strategies, Indigenous intellectuals met to create a book with hands-on suggestions and activities to enable Indigenous communities to decolonize themselves. The authors begin with the belief that Indigenous Peoples have the power, strength, and intelligence to develop culturally specific decolonization strategies for their own communities and thereby systematically pursue their own liberation. These scholars and writers demystify the language of colonization and decolonization to help Indigenous communities identify useful concepts, terms, and intellectual frameworks in their struggles toward liberation and self-determination. This handbook covers a wide range of topics, including Indigenous governance, education, language, oral tradition, repatriation, images and stereotypes, and truth-telling. It aims to facilitate critical thinking while offering recommendations for fostering community discussions and plans for meaningful community action.


     
     
  5. hyperallergic:

This is believed to be the only known portrait of the last survivor of the Beothuk people of the area now known as Newfoundland, Canada.
The above portrait was painted by William Gosse and it is titled “A female Red Indian of Newfoundland” (1841). It is believed to be a portrait of Shanawdithit, the last recorded Beothuk woman. She died in 1829 and with her death the Beothuk people became officially extinct as a separate ethnic group. Some say that her death marks the first total genocide in North America.
It is unclear if the portrait was done based on sketches from her lifetime or oral accounts of people who had known her.

    hyperallergic:

    This is believed to be the only known portrait of the last survivor of the Beothuk people of the area now known as Newfoundland, Canada.

    The above portrait was painted by William Gosse and it is titled “A female Red Indian of Newfoundland” (1841). It is believed to be a portrait of Shanawdithit, the last recorded Beothuk woman. She died in 1829 and with her death the Beothuk people became officially extinct as a separate ethnic group. Some say that her death marks the first total genocide in North America.

    It is unclear if the portrait was done based on sketches from her lifetime or oral accounts of people who had known her.

     
     
  6. 
Soy mujer indigena salvadoreña y tengo derecho a vestir como mis antepasados

    Soy mujer indigena salvadoreña y tengo derecho a vestir como mis antepasados

     
     
  7. Powerful Poster.

    Powerful Poster.

    (Source: selucha)

     
     
  8. fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

fuckyeahmesoamerica:

Olmec Megalith

The ancient Olmec civilization flourished in the area currently occupying south central Mexico in the period between the years 1500 BC to 400 BC. They were the first major Mesoamerican civilization. These colossal heads, carved into single blocks of volcanic basalt, are the most easily recognizable part of their heritage, although there are only seventeen such heads which have been discovered to date. Little is known about the Olmecs and the meaning of their stone heads. Many theories abound with regards to the nature and significance of these statues. They have even been theorized to represent Africans which made the trip to America across the Atlantic ocean thousands of years ago, although such theories of pre-Columbian transatlantic travel are not accepted by most Archeologists and Mesoamerican experts.

    fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

    fuckyeahmesoamerica:

    Olmec Megalith

    The ancient Olmec civilization flourished in the area currently occupying south central Mexico in the period between the years 1500 BC to 400 BC. They were the first major Mesoamerican civilization. These colossal heads, carved into single blocks of volcanic basalt, are the most easily recognizable part of their heritage, although there are only seventeen such heads which have been discovered to date. Little is known about the Olmecs and the meaning of their stone heads. Many theories abound with regards to the nature and significance of these statues. They have even been theorized to represent Africans which made the trip to America across the Atlantic ocean thousands of years ago, although such theories of pre-Columbian transatlantic travel are not accepted by most Archeologists and Mesoamerican experts.

     
     
  9. fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

obsessedwithfridakahlo:

Kahlo and Rivera, Side by Side in Istanbul - NYTimes.com

Joint Frida Kahlo/Diego Rivera exhibit in Turkey.
     
     
  10. Martin Sorrondeguy, former vocalist for Los Crudos, is the producer of this powerful and uplifting documentary about the U.S. Latino punk scene and the DIY movement.

    ***

    I appreciate this documentary because I feel it brings me some focus from blurred vision.  Just when I thought to be the lonesome Latino gringo, i stumble across this doc.  I’ve always felt rejected by Latinos for “not being Latino enough”, by black folks who saw me completely as white and not as of color, whites who were racists but accepted me for appearing white… And although I am not punk, I appreciate the existence of the scene, the Latinos who make this music and the fans who listen to it.

     
     
  11. feministindianmanifesto:

I laughed way too hard at “White racists go back to Europe”. LOL

I LOVE the Mexica Movement, A LOT!

    feministindianmanifesto:

    I laughed way too hard at “White racists go back to Europe”. LOL

    I LOVE the Mexica Movement, A LOT!

     
     
  12. fuckyeaharchaeology:

The Mayan settlement of Palenque [located in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas] was built between 200AD and 600AD,  though the Maya began settling in the rain forests of southern Mexico  about 1000BC. The Temple of Inscriptions includes the tomb of the Maya  ruler Pacal.
Photograph by Stephen Alvarez, National Geographic.

    fuckyeaharchaeology:

    The Mayan settlement of Palenque [located in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas] was built between 200AD and 600AD, though the Maya began settling in the rain forests of southern Mexico about 1000BC. The Temple of Inscriptions includes the tomb of the Maya ruler Pacal.

    Photograph by Stephen Alvarez, National Geographic.

     
     
  13. Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan, “The Mother of Gods”, is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. 
The word “Coatlicue" is Nahuatl for “the one with the skirt of serpents”. She is referred to variously by the epithets  “Mother Goddess of the Earth who gives birth to all celestial things”,  “Goddess of Fire and Fertility”, “Goddess of Life, Death and Rebirth”,  and “Mother of the Southern Stars”.
She is represented as a woman wearing a skirt of writhing snakes and a necklace  made of human hearts, hands, and skulls. Her feet and hands are adorned  with claws and her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from nursing. Her face is formed by two facing serpents (after her head was cut off and the blood spurt forth from her neck in the form of two gigantic serpents),   referring to the myth that she was sacrificed during the beginning of the present creation.
Most Aztec artistic representations of this goddess emphasize her  deadly side, because Earth, as well as loving mother, is the insatiable  monster that consumes everything that liveth. She represents the  devouring mother, in whom both the womb and the grave exist.
Many don’t know, but the Virgin of Guadalupe is Coatlicue.  She was named Guadalupe and made a European saint… but the Indigenous still knew her as the Goddess that she was.  She survived through the grapevine.
Lady of Guadalupe, She  is also much more than the mother of Jesus, much older. Before the  Spaniards came, people of mexico already had a complex society steeped  in its own spiritual and religious beliefs.  Tonantzin, was divine  mother, their Goddess. She spoke to Juan Diego in Nahuatl (one of the  native languages of mexico) and identified herself as the mother of god.  The Spanish clergy assumed “oh, she must mean OUR god!” forgetting that  the  deities of the Aztecs also had mothers. She was not fair skinned  but dark as the indigenous people she called her children. The names she  gave to Juan Diego and to his uncle include: tequantlaxopueh (she who  banishes those who ate us), tlecuauhtlacupeh (she who comes flying from  the light like an eagle) and coaltlaxopeh. There are no corresponding  sounds in the Spanish language, and so may have been replaced by  convenient romance language sounds to form the word Guadalupe.  Interestingly enough, the site of La Basilica is the site of a destroyed  temple to Our Lady Coatlicue, the goddess of the earth. Was she just  asking for her home to be rebuilt? In 1531, she appeared at Tepeyac to a  young Juan Diego identifying herself as Inninantzin in huelneli (mother  of the true god), and asking him to carry her message to the bishop  that she wanted her sacred house built on that spot. Of course the  European bishop ignored Juan Diego’s story. When Juan Diego suggested  that maybe she should send someone more important, she insisted that it  must be he, the smallest of all her children, who should deliver the  message of the queen of heaven. Again Juan Diego approached the Bishop,  who then asked for proof. But, distracted by the needs of his dying  uncle, Juan Diego didn’t go to Tepeyac. She appeared to him on his way  to fetch a priest and told him to open his heart and not be afraid, that  his uncle was well. “Am I not your mother? Will I not protect you?” She  instructed him to pick flowers growing on the normally barren spot and  take them as proof. When he got an audience with the Bishop, he let his  cloak full of flowers fall. The image of Our Lady was printed on the  cloth, not painted by a human hand. It still hangs in the cathedral  built for her.

    Coatlicue, also known as Teteoinan, “The Mother of Gods”, is the Aztec goddess who gave birth to the moon, stars, and Huitzilopochtli, the god of the sun and war. 

    The word “Coatlicue" is Nahuatl for “the one with the skirt of serpents”. She is referred to variously by the epithets “Mother Goddess of the Earth who gives birth to all celestial things”, “Goddess of Fire and Fertility”, “Goddess of Life, Death and Rebirth”, and “Mother of the Southern Stars”.

    She is represented as a woman wearing a skirt of writhing snakes and a necklace made of human hearts, hands, and skulls. Her feet and hands are adorned with claws and her breasts are depicted as hanging flaccid from nursing. Her face is formed by two facing serpents (after her head was cut off and the blood spurt forth from her neck in the form of two gigantic serpents),   referring to the myth that she was sacrificed during the beginning of the present creation.

    Most Aztec artistic representations of this goddess emphasize her deadly side, because Earth, as well as loving mother, is the insatiable monster that consumes everything that liveth. She represents the devouring mother, in whom both the womb and the grave exist.

    Many don’t know, but the Virgin of Guadalupe is Coatlicue.  She was named Guadalupe and made a European saint… but the Indigenous still knew her as the Goddess that she was.  She survived through the grapevine.

    Lady of Guadalupe, She is also much more than the mother of Jesus, much older. Before the Spaniards came, people of mexico already had a complex society steeped in its own spiritual and religious beliefs. Tonantzin, was divine mother, their Goddess. She spoke to Juan Diego in Nahuatl (one of the native languages of mexico) and identified herself as the mother of god. The Spanish clergy assumed “oh, she must mean OUR god!” forgetting that the deities of the Aztecs also had mothers. She was not fair skinned but dark as the indigenous people she called her children. The names she gave to Juan Diego and to his uncle include: tequantlaxopueh (she who banishes those who ate us), tlecuauhtlacupeh (she who comes flying from the light like an eagle) and coaltlaxopeh. There are no corresponding sounds in the Spanish language, and so may have been replaced by convenient romance language sounds to form the word Guadalupe. Interestingly enough, the site of La Basilica is the site of a destroyed temple to Our Lady Coatlicue, the goddess of the earth. Was she just asking for her home to be rebuilt? In 1531, she appeared at Tepeyac to a young Juan Diego identifying herself as Inninantzin in huelneli (mother of the true god), and asking him to carry her message to the bishop that she wanted her sacred house built on that spot. Of course the European bishop ignored Juan Diego’s story. When Juan Diego suggested that maybe she should send someone more important, she insisted that it must be he, the smallest of all her children, who should deliver the message of the queen of heaven. Again Juan Diego approached the Bishop, who then asked for proof. But, distracted by the needs of his dying uncle, Juan Diego didn’t go to Tepeyac. She appeared to him on his way to fetch a priest and told him to open his heart and not be afraid, that his uncle was well. “Am I not your mother? Will I not protect you?” She instructed him to pick flowers growing on the normally barren spot and take them as proof. When he got an audience with the Bishop, he let his cloak full of flowers fall. The image of Our Lady was printed on the cloth, not painted by a human hand. It still hangs in the cathedral built for her.

     
     
  14. fylatinamerica:

San Salvador, El Salvador
(Nuestros Angeles de El Salvador)

    fylatinamerica:

    San Salvador, El Salvador

    (Nuestros Angeles de El Salvador)

     
     
  15.