Radical, Queer, Brown Boy

A Guanaco's Personal Blog on Race, Class, Gender, Liberation, Culture, Art & Queerness.

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  1. luckyanomaly:

improper:






In 2011, researchers at the University of Chicago conducted a simple experiment to ascertain whether a rat would release another rat from a cage without being given a reward. The answer was yes. After several sessions, the rats learned intentionally and quickly to open the restrainer and release the caged rats. The rats also repeated the behaviour even when they were denied the reward of reunion. Even more astonishing, when the rats were presented with two cages, one containing a rat, the other chocolate, they chose to open both cages and “typically shared the chocolate”.


Morality without religion



I would need chocolate to release some of you. ;P 

TumbleOn)

    luckyanomaly:

    improper:

    In 2011, researchers at the University of Chicago conducted a simple experiment to ascertain whether a rat would release another rat from a cage without being given a reward. The answer was yes. After several sessions, the rats learned intentionally and quickly to open the restrainer and release the caged rats. The rats also repeated the behaviour even when they were denied the reward of reunion. Even more astonishing, when the rats were presented with two cages, one containing a rat, the other chocolate, they chose to open both cages and “typically shared the chocolate”.

    Morality without religion

    I would need chocolate to release some of you. ;P 

    (Source: sinidentidades)

     
     
  2. jayaprada:

    Incarceration Nation via Black Agenda Reports

    The U.S. imprisons more people per capita than any country on earth, accounting for 25 percent of the world’s prisoners, despite having just five percent of the world’s population.

    America currently holds over two million in prisons with double that number under supervision of parole and probation, according to federal government figures.

    Mass incarceration consumes over $50-billion annually across America – money far better spent on creating jobs and improving education.

    Under federal law persons with drug convictions like Garner are permanently barred from receiving financial aid for education, food stamps, welfare and publicly funded housing.

    But only drug convictions trigger these exclusions under federal law. Violent bank robbers, white-collar criminals like Wall Street scam artists who steal billions, and even murderers who’ve done their time do not face the post-release deprivations slapped on those with drug convictions on their records, including those imprisoned for simple possession, and not major drug sales.

    “Academics see this topic of mass incarceration as numbers, but for millions it is their daily lives,” said Princeton conference panelist Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean of Yale University.

    Exclusions mandated by federal laws compound the legal deprivations of rights found in the laws of most states, such as barring ex-felons from jobs and even stripping ex-felons of their right to vote.

    “Mass incarceration raises questions of protecting and preserving democracy,” Dr. Brown-Dean said, citing the estimated five-million-plus Americans barred from voting by such felony disenfranchisement laws.

    Many of those felony disenfranchisement laws date from measures enacted in the late 1800s which were devised specifically to bar blacks from voting, as a way to preserve America’s apartheid.

    During the 2000 presidential election Republican officials in Florida fraudulently manipulated that state’s anti-felon voting law to bar tens of thousands of blacks from voting. For example, many people with common names like John Smith who shared their name with a felon were also barred from voting, despite having clear records.

    Yet George W. Bush won by Florida – the state where his brother Jeb served as Governor – by 537 votes. That victory in the state where George W.’s brother Jeb served as governor sent him to the White House.

    Policies creating barriers to things like education and employment make it “increasingly difficult” for persons recently released from prison to “remain crime-free” according to a report released earlier this year by the Smart on Crime Coalition.

    More than 60 percent of the two-million-plus people in American prisons are racial and ethnic minorities.

    “The U.S. imprisons more than South Africa did under apartheid. A nation that promotes democracy has a racial caste in its prisons. We must break that caste system,” said the special guest speaker at the “Imprisonment” conference, Pennsylvania Death Row Journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal, who telephoned from prison.

    Racism is written all over the economically/socially debilitating practices embedded in mass incarceration.

    A recent University of Wisconsin study found that 17 percent of white ex-con job seekers received interviews, compared to only five percent of black ex-con job seekers – a race-based disparity that is additionally devastating for people of color like Garner.


    Ohio State University Law Professor Michelle Alexander, the featured speaker at that Princeton conference streamed live on the internet, said a major reason why imprisonment rates soared during the past four decades despite decreases in crime rates is anti-crime policies craftily manipulated by conservative Republican officials for political purposes.

    Harsh anti-crimes policies of the 1970s and 1980s were largely a “punitive backlash” to advances of the Civil Rights Movement, said Alexander, author of the hugely popular 2010 book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.

    Pennsylvania’s prison population, for example, soared from 8,243 in 1980 to 51,487 in 2010, while the California prison population leapt during the same period from 23,264 to over 170,000.

    Incarceration costs are particularly obscene when compared to college costs.

    A report released in January 2011 by Pennsylvania’s auditor general that noted the Keystone State now spends $32,059 annually to imprison one person…a cost that exceeds the annual $20,074 tuition for the MBA degree program at Penn State University.

    A report released in January 2010 by a UCLA professor noted that the Golden State spends over $48,000 annually to imprison one person, more than four times the tuition cost of UCLA for a California resident. Back in 1980, California spent more of its state budget on higher education than on prisons, but that had reversed by 2010, with more of that state’s budget going for prisons than for higher education.

    America’s corrosive War on Drugs – a “war” that basically ignores drug kingpins – has devastated black families, author/professor Alexander said.

    “A black child today is less likely to be raised in a two-parent household than during slavery,” she said. “In major urban areas almost one-half of black men have criminal records. Thus they face a lifetime of legalized discrimination,” encompassing exclusions from employment and access to financial assistance required to secure a viable quality of life.

    Africa-Americans are 13 percent of America’s population and 14 percent of the nation’s drug users but are 37 percent of persons arrested for drugs and 56 percent of the inmates in state prisons for drug offenses, noted the 2009 congressional testimony of Marc Mauer, executive director of the Sentencing Project and a conference panelist.

    Both ex-felon Herman Garner and Dr. Eddie Glaude Jr., chair of Princeton’s Center for African American Studies, which hosted the conference, expressed similar views on the impacts of mass incarceration.

    read more

     
     
  3. queer-core:

    transfeminism:

    These are graph from “Injustice at Every Turn” showing rate of sexual assault in jail/prison. The first graph is the rates of sexual assaults for trans women by race. The rates break down as follows:

    • Nineteen percent of all trans women who went to jail/prison
    • Thirty-eight percent of Black trans women
    • Thirty percent of America Indians trans women
    • Twenty-five percent of trans Latinas
    • Twenty-four percent of multiracial trans women
    • Twelve percent of White trans women
    • Too small of a sample to report for Asian Pacific Islander trans women

    According to “Injustice at Every Turn,” a report of institutionalized discrimination against trans people: “Transgender women of color were particularly vulnerable to sexual assault in jail/prison. Thirty-eight percent (38%) of Black [trans women] respondents reported being sexually assaulted by either another inmate or a staff member in jail/prison.”

    Multiracial, Latina, Black and American Indian trans women are twice to more then three times as likely as White trans women to be sexually assaulted in prison.

    This is the only statistic in the report that simultaneously accounts for both the race and gender of participants. Taken by themselves trans women and trans people of color experience higher rates of discrimination than trans men, nonbinary and white trans people.

    The second graph shows sexual assault rates in prison/jail by gender. The rates are for trans women:

    • Eighteen percent by inmates
    • Seven percent by staff
    • Twenty percent by anyone

    For trans men:

    • Two percent by inmates
    • Four percent by staff
    • Six percent by anyone

    For all trans people:

    • Fourteen percent by inmates
    • Seven percent by staff
    • Sixteen percent by anyone

    Gender nonconforming people:

    • Six percent by inmates
    • Four percent by staff
    • Eight percent by anyone

    Trans women in jail/prison are three to nine times as likely to be sexually assaulted by inmates, nearly twice as likely to be sexually assaulted by staff, and about three (2.5 - 3.33) times as likely to be sexually assaulted by anyone when compared to trans men and gender nonconforming people in jail/prison.

    The third graph shows sexual assault rates in prison/jail by race. These break down for all trans people who went to jail/prison:

    • Thirteen percent by inmates
    • Six percent by staff
    • Fifteen percent by anyone

    American Indian (sample size too small for reliable analysis):

    • Twenty-seven percent by inmates
    • Eighteen percent by staff
    • Twenty-seven percent by anyone

    Asian Pacific Islander (sample size too small for reliable analysis):

    • Six percent by inmates
    • Six percent by staff
    • Eleven percent by anyone

    Black:

    • Thirty-two percent by inmates
    • Nine percent by staff
    • Thirty-four percent by anyone

    Latin@:

    • Twenty-one percent by inmates
    • Seven percent by staff
    • Twenty-four percent by anyone

    White:

    • Seven percent by inmates
    • Four percent by staff
    • Nine percent by anyone

    Multiracial:

    • Fourteen percent by inmates
    • Eight percent by staff
    • Sixteen percent by anyone

    With a similar break down to that of the first graph showing race and gender, trans people of color in jail/prison are significantly more likely to be sexually assaulted when compared to White trans people in jail/prison.

    i wonder what the exact statistic is for nonbinary trans people

     
     
  4. dumbthingswhitepplsay:

siddharthasmama:

live-intoxicated:

typeless:

FreeAhmed.com
fbpg fbgroup
twitter

Wow. Fuck our government.

White people = innocent until proven guilty; still innocent even when found guilty.
Brown/Black people = guilty, guilty, guilty - oh, wait, you’re innocent? You’re still Brown/Black, so, fuck that, you’re guilty!

:|

    dumbthingswhitepplsay:

    siddharthasmama:

    live-intoxicated:

    typeless:

    FreeAhmed.com

    fbpg fbgroup

    twitter

    Wow. Fuck our government.

    White people = innocent until proven guilty; still innocent even when found guilty.

    Brown/Black people = guilty, guilty, guilty - oh, wait, you’re innocent? You’re still Brown/Black, so, fuck that, you’re guilty!

    :|

    (Source: occupiedmuslim)

     
     
  5. meloukhia:

    Forcing prison inmates to work as unpaid laborers is not a new practice, but GOP-controlled states are increasing taking the idea to extremes as they face budget shortfalls and refuse to raise taxes. Under Gov. Scott Walker (R-WI) anti-collective bargaining law, at least one Wisconsin county replaced some union workers with prison labor. Inmates are not paid for their work, but may receive time off of their sentences.

    Now Camden County in Georgia is considering tasking prisoners to take on one of the most dangerous jobs there is: fighting fires. Using prisoners as firefighters is a cost-cutting measure that’s expected to save the county a bundle.

    California already does this.

    What is this, New Age Slavery?

    (Source: abbyjean)

     
     
  6. thetendergravityofkindness:

    crunkfeministcollective:

    radicallyhottoff:

    thecurvature:

    This horrific story offers a window into the reality of life for low socioeconomic status minorities:

    Ikenna, a 28-year old construction worker, went to deposit a $8,463.21 Chase cashier’s check at his local Chase branch, only for the teller to decide that neither he nor his check looked right and he got tossed in jail for forgery, KING5 reports. The next day, a Friday the bank realized its mistake and left a message with the detective. But it was her day off, so he spent the entire weekend in jail.
    By the time he got out, he had been fired from his job for not showing up to work. His car had been towed as well. It ended up getting sold off at auction because he couldn’t afford to get it out of the pound. He had been relying on that cashier’s check for his money but it was taken as evidence and by the time he got it back it was auctioned off.
    All this while the cashier’s check had been issued by the very bank he was trying to cash it at.
    Chase didn’t even apologize, not even after a year.

    Meanwhile, in his freshly pressed khakis, the young white college student who used to live across the hall managed to cash, on two separate occasions, two checks he stole out of my mailbox and forged without the slightest problem.

    But hey, I’m sure this has nothing to do with race or class.

    Whaaaaat the fuck.

    I can’t even articulate in words how this angers me. I really can’t. When are we burning this whole thing down? Tomorrow? I’ll be there.

    Holy fucking shit. 

    (Source: abbyjean)

     
     
  7. fuckyeahradicalcartoons:

via
Fourteen examples of systemic racism in the U.S. criminal justice system
Andrea Lyon: The Prison Industrial Complex
Privatized Prisons and Prison Labor IS Slavery
     
     
  8. fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Download flier in PDF format here

    fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

    Download flier in PDF format here

     
     
  9. DREAMers Arrested in Indiana Yesterday on Hunger Strike

    DREAMers Arrested in Indiana Yesterday on Hunger Strike

    By Maegan La Mala

    10 May 2011

    Earlier, when I wrote about President Obama’s immigration speech, I mentioned the arrests of five DREAM Activists in Indiana.

    Erick, Omar, Lupe, Paola and Sayra were arrested yesterday in Gov. Daniels office in Indiana protesting two immigration laws that passed in the state legislature. Senate Bill 590 is similar to Arizona’s SB1070 and would make local police into de facto immigration agents. HB1402 forces undocumented Indiana students to pay out-of-state tuition rates – triple the cost of in-state rates in some cases. The protesters demanded a meeting with Daniels, a request he denied.

    Now incarcerated, the Indiana Five started a hunger strike, refusing to be bonded out of jail, until the Governor vetoes HB1402 and SB590. The media is reporting that a spokesperson for Daniels says the governor is expected to sign the bills into law.

    There is a petition you can sign urging Governor Daniels to veto Senate Bill 590 and House Bill 1402 immediately. The DREAMers are also requesting donations towards a bail fund.

     
     
  10. Australia’s Indigenous incarceration crisis

    By Chloe

    An indigenous Australian is 15 times more likely than a non-Aboriginal Australian. Indigenous Australians constitute 2% of the country’s population, and 25% of its prison population. And of the 2056 inmates to die in custody in Australia between 1982 and 2008, 379 of them – that’s 18% – were Aboriginal.

    Those numbers represent a crisis of which all Australians should be thoroughly ashamed.

    This year marks the twentieth anniversary of the release of the findings in a royal commission investigation of Aboriginal deaths in custody. That commission was launched in response to the violent death of a 16-year-old boy, John Pat, in police custody in 1983.

    That commission issued over 300 recommendations. And while those recommendations were well-received, critics believe that their implementation failed.

    To Mick Gooda, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner, the report’s release was a moment of great hope for Australia’s Aboriginal people. But while he believes the royal commission itself was perfect, the implementation of its recommendations has been the problem.

    “We ended up with recommendations that went to almost every facet of life that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience here.

    “I thought we approached it as if it was a program of work to be done, instead of embedding all those practices in the way we do business every day of the week, every day of the year. “And I think we missed an opportunity to do that with that report,” he said.

    In other words, systemic problems require systemic solutions.

    That missed opportunity has had disastrous consequences. While Aboriginal deaths in custody have become less frequent, the rate of incarceration among indigenous Australians has more than doubled. In the 1980s, when the commission began its work, indigenous Australians accounted for 12%-15% of Australian inmates. Now, the figure is 25%. And, in the blunt words of the head of research for the commission, “The more people there, then, clearly, the more are going to die.”

    And the issue of indigenous deaths in custody has never been more relevant; just this month, the inquest into the suicide in custody of a transgender Aboriginal woman, released its findings. In March 2009, Veronica Baxter was transferred from a women’s prison to a men’s facility, and was found dead two days later. The inquest found that the Department of Corrective Services could not have done anything to prevent her death.

    Twenty years after the release of the royal commission findings, deaths in custody are down, which, of course, is wonderful. But with an incarceration rate fifteen times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians, which carries with it a higher risk of death and the unavoidable conclusion that Aboriginal Australians are being treated very differently by law enforcement, it doesn’t feel like much of a victory.

     
     
  11. bradicalmang:


The United States Locks Babies Up In Prisons
Most of Hutto’s inmates are in the process of applying for political asylum, refugees from violence-plagued and impoverished countries like Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Somalia, Palestine, Lithuania, Romania, Iraq, or some other one of 41 countries in the throes of political turmoil or war, or suffering the effects of climate change.There are around 490 detainees there at any given time, and they come from many different countries. They have not been charged with a crime against the United States, and are locked in cells and forced to wear prison uniforms. The inmates are immigrants, or children of immigrants who are in deportation proceedings, or who are applied for asylum and waiting for decisions. It can take up to a year or more to receive an asylum decision. Many detainees die as prisoners before they reach the end of their waiting time, due to untreated medical conditions or abuse. Nearly half of Hutto’s residents are children, including infants and toddlers. Most of the rest are women, many of them in varying stages of pregnancy. The women receive little or no prenatal care whatsoever. The children are dressed in prison garb, eat very unsatisfactory prison food, and only receive one hour of play time, and one hour of schooling per day, in English only. The kids are getting sick from the food. There were complaints of lack of a pediatrician on site, lack of privacy in the bathrooms, rotten food, lack of age-appropriate toys, nothing to write with, etc, etc. It was also reported that children were threatened by guards that harm would be inflicted on their parents if they didn’t behave, among many other abuses, including rape of female inmates in front of their children.The detainees are not violent, nor are they criminals, and sometimes there is no reason for them to be there other than that during a ICE raid on a factory, they had the misfortune to be found without their papers on them. After being detained and imprisoned, they are powerless to obtain the papers or evidence necessary to prove their innocence of any wrong-doing. Besides not having an opportunity to prove their innocence, they are also denied legal representation. And most of the time, their families are completely unaware of their whereabouts. They are not allowed any visitors and speaking to them is prohibited. In fact, entrance to the facility by the United Nations for inspection purposes was denied!The families are only allowed to be together in their pods during the day time, but in the evening, the children are separated from the mothers, and locked into individual cells. If a baby or a small child is ill, or crying, the mothers are not allowed to go to their children to take care of nor to comfort them.
The kids have no toys, can not run and play outside like other children, and live in a constant terror that their mothers will be taken away by the jailers, and that they will never see them again. They do not understand why they are being punished. They receive little, if any, medical or dental care. They are not allowed to have even a stuffed animal to snuggle at night.

    bradicalmang:

    The United States Locks Babies Up In Prisons

    Most of Hutto’s inmates are in the process of applying for political asylum, refugees from violence-plagued and impoverished countries like Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Somalia, Palestine, Lithuania, Romania, Iraq, or some other one of 41 countries in the throes of political turmoil or war, or suffering the effects of climate change.

    There are around 490 detainees there at any given time, and they come from many different countries. They have not been charged with a crime against the United States, and are locked in cells and forced to wear prison uniforms. 

    The inmates are immigrants, or children of immigrants who are in deportation proceedings, or who are applied for asylum and waiting for decisions. It can take up to a year or more to receive an asylum decision. Many detainees die as prisoners before they reach the end of their waiting time, due to untreated medical conditions or abuse. 

    Nearly half of Hutto’s residents are children, including infants and toddlers. Most of the rest are women, many of them in varying stages of pregnancy. The women receive little or no prenatal care whatsoever. The children are dressed in prison garb, eat very unsatisfactory prison food, and only receive one hour of play time, and one hour of schooling per day, in English only. The kids are getting sick from the food. There were complaints of lack of a pediatrician on site, lack of privacy in the bathrooms, rotten food, lack of age-appropriate toys, nothing to write with, etc, etc. It was also reported that children were threatened by guards that harm would be inflicted on their parents if they didn’t behave, among many other abuses, including rape of female inmates in front of their children.

    The detainees are not violent, nor are they criminals, and sometimes there is no reason for them to be there other than that during a ICE raid on a factory, they had the misfortune to be found without their papers on them. After being detained and imprisoned, they are powerless to obtain the papers or evidence necessary to prove their innocence of any wrong-doing. Besides not having an opportunity to prove their innocence, they are also denied legal representation. And most of the time, their families are completely unaware of their whereabouts. They are not allowed any visitors and speaking to them is prohibited. In fact, entrance to the facility by the United Nations for inspection purposes was denied!

    The families are only allowed to be together in their pods during the day time, but in the evening, the children are separated from the mothers, and locked into individual cells. If a baby or a small child is ill, or crying, the mothers are not allowed to go to their children to take care of nor to comfort them.

    The kids have no toys, can not run and play outside like other children, and live in a constant terror that their mothers will be taken away by the jailers, and that they will never see them again. They do not understand why they are being punished. They receive little, if any, medical or dental care. They are not allowed to have even a stuffed animal to snuggle at night.

     
     
  12. tenderlovingcare:

“Mara Savatrucha, or MS-13, is one the most notorious gangs in the world. Yet MS-13 and other gangs such as Calle 18 originated just decades ago among the Salvadorian immigrant community of Los Angeles. Soon the US authorities began deporting gang members back to El Salvador, exporting LA gang culture to a country rife with weapons from civil war and sparking an explosion in vicious gang-related crime. MS-13 currently has over 50,000 members in the US, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Cities like San Salvador, El Salvador’s capital, experience some of the highest murder rates in the world.” 

    tenderlovingcare:

    “Mara Savatrucha, or MS-13, is one the most notorious gangs in the world. Yet MS-13 and other gangs such as Calle 18 originated just decades ago among the Salvadorian immigrant community of Los Angeles. Soon the US authorities began deporting gang members back to El Salvador, exporting LA gang culture to a country rife with weapons from civil war and sparking an explosion in vicious gang-related crime. MS-13 currently has over 50,000 members in the US, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Cities like San Salvador, El Salvador’s capital, experience some of the highest murder rates in the world.” 

     
     
  13. (Source: pyoereae)

     
     
  14.  
     
  15. feministindianmanifesto:

    firesandwords:

    Black Mother Jailed For Sending Kids to White School District

    An Ohio mother of two was sentenced to 10 days in jail and placed on three years probation after sending her kids to a school district in which they did not live. Kelly Williams-Bolar was sentenced by Judge…

    Please read the full article. It’s truly disturbing.